Anna Nasser

anna.nasser[at]unina.it

PhD in: GLOBAL HISTORY AND GOVERNANCE
Ciclo: XXXV

Titolo progetto: Between Empire and Race: French women's organizations during decolonization (1944-1962)

Supervisor(s): Prof. Olindo De Napoli


Education

September 2016 – March 2019
Master in International Relations
Department of Political Sciences
University of Bologna – Alma Mater Studiorum
Final Mark: 110/110 cum laude
Dissertation in Comparative Political History: Cittadinanza, nazione e razza nel dibattito politico in Francia e negli Stati Uniti (1989-2008). First advisor: Professor Stefano Cavazza, second advisor: Professor Raffaella Baritono.

September – November 2018
Research Scholarship for dissertation of University of Bologna;
Sciences Po Paris

January – May 2018
Exchange student
Dickinson College, Carlisle (PA), United States

September 2017 – January 2018
Erasmus student
Université Paris 1 – Panthéon-Sorbonne

September 2013 – July 2016
Bachelor in Political, Social, and International Sciences;
curriculum of International Relations
Department of Political Sciences
University of Bologna – Alma Mater Studiorum
Final Mark: 110/110
Dissertation in History and Politics of the United States of America: L’ideologia nella politica estera americana: il caso della guerra Ispano-Americana (1898). First advisor: Professor Raffaella Baritono.

This project will investigate the relationship between women’s organizations, led by black and African women, as well as French white women, and operating in the colonial territories, and the French metropolitain state in the period of time between 1944 and 1962, namely the period in which the possibility first, and then the concrete process of decolonization, took place. It will be done so by looking at the experience of Jane Vialle and of the Association des Femmes de l’Union française as an important case for understanding the involvement of women within imperial and post imperial policies, the relationship between white and black French women, and the attempted restructuring of the French empire. In this sense, this project aims at casting a new light on the last years of the French colonial empire, called since 1946 “French Union”, and to develop a better understanding not only on how the process of decolonization affected black and African women, but also on how it developed a window of opportunity, both in France and in the colonies, for a wider social and political participation for women.