Welcome to the Third cycle of highly interdisciplinary Scientific Colloquia

Each colloquium starts with a 50-minute-long seminar by an expert in the field, followed by interactive discussion with the audience. The talks are aimed primarily at PhD students, and young researchers, but are open to all those interested.

These events are organized by the PhD programs in “Advanced Mathematical and Physical Sciences for Advanced Materials and Technologies”, “Cosmology, Space Science and Space Technology” and “Modeling and Engineering Risk and Complexity”.

Next Colloquium

Spin-orbit optical phenomena and their applications

Lorenzo Marrucci

Professor at University of Naples Federico II – Italy

24 November 2022 – 2:30 pm CET

Where: Classroom 4 at Scuola superiore Meridionale, and broadcast online on Zoom

How to join online:
Meeting room: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/84144212706?pwd=R0dzT3NpS3ZESFd5TjR1Y2U5Qzg0dz09
Meeting ID: 841 4421 2706
Passcode: ssm_zoom

Abstract: The angular momentum of a light beam in the paraxial limit can be split into spin and orbital components. Only recently, optical processes involving a conversion of angular momentum from one form to another and related phenomena were conceived and experimentally demonstrated. I will more specifically focus on the effects generated by optical devices named q-plates and their ensuing generalizations, which have proved to be extremely convenient tools for controlling the phase and polarization structure of light beams. Several applications of these devices have been demonstrated in classical photonics and in quantum optics during the last years. In this presentation, after introducing the main concepts of spin-orbit optical couplings and the underlying physics, I will review a selection of recent applications.

Short bio: Lorenzo Marrucci is currently full professor of Experimental Physics of Matter at the Federico II University of Naples. After completing a master’s and a PhD in physics at the University of Naples, he did his post-doctoral work at the University of California at Berkeley, in USA, and then returned to Naples as a researcher and then professor. His interests are mainly focused on optics and photonics, both classical and quantum, and on complex materials and light-matter interactions. Marrucci has been the author or coauthor of over 200 scientific articles in international journals and of five patents. In particular, he is internationally known for his invention of the q-plate, a liquid crystal device that can convert a variation of the spin angular momentum of light into orbital angular momentum. Marrucci has been principal investigator or coordinator of many national and international research projects, including a FET-Open and an ERC-Advanced Grant. He has also held various academic-management positions; currently he is Vice Rector for research at the University of Naples.

Program 2022 – 2023

Quantum Complexity
10 November 2022 – 2:30 pm CET   |   Alioscia Hamma, Professor at Department of Physics, University of Naples Federico II – Italy

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Abstract: Quantum physics is inherently different from classical physics and this difference comes in two layers. First, there is entanglement, that is, the fact that quantum correlations are stronger than classical correlations. Second,  quantum physics is both exponentially harder to simulate than classical physics and exponentially more powerful if harnessed to perform computation, which is a the root of quantum computation.

In this colloquium, we will talk about the resources that make quantum computers different from classical ones. We show why quantum algorithms can be exponentially better than classical ones and survey the theoretical and practical problems in actually building a useful quantum computer.

Moreover, we show why understanding quantum complexity is important to both practical applications and some of the most fascinating problems in theoretical physics. We show that one particular metric of quantum complexity, the Stabilizer Rényi Entropy, is connected to the hardness of quantum verification, the onset of quantum chaos, and  the scrambling of information in a Black Hole.

Short bio: Alioscia Hamma got his PhD in Napoli and has been a postdoc at MIT and Perimeter institute before becoming professor at Tsinghua University, Beijing and later at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. Now he is Associate Professor at the Università degli studi di Napoli Federico II.

Complex network systems: introduction and open challenges
17 November 2022 – 2:30 pm CET   |   Pietro De Lellis, Professor at University of Naples Federico II – Italy

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Abstract: The talk will first provide an overview of the main concepts and tools for modeling, analyzing and controlling complex systems composed of interacting dynamical units. Select collective behaviors, such as consensus and synchronization, will be defined, and their emergence will be related to the topological properties of the interaction network.

Then, the talk will focus on a selection of emerging methodological problems and trending applications, spanning from artificial financial markets to the study of human migration dynamics.

Short bio: Pietro De Lellis received the Ph.D. degree in automation engineering from the University of Naples Federico II (UNINA) in 2009. From 2010 to 2014, he was Post-Doctoral Fellow at UNINA, with appointments at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering, and Adjunct Professor with the Italian Air Force Institute of Technology. In 2014, he became Assistant Professor at UNINA, and was the youngest to obtain the National Habilitation (NH) as Associate Professor of Control Theory. Since 2020, he is Associate Professor at UNINA, and obtained the NH as Full Professor.

Since 2010, he has been Visiting Professor at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering, where he taught Automatic Control, and participated to several joint research projects. De Lellis receives funding from several funding bodies and institutions in Italy and the EU, conducts research on complex network systems, and authored more than 100 scientific publications (goo.gl/pKgVVh, 2400-citations, h-index 20). His publications include papers in highly renewed cross-disciplinary journals, such as Nature Communications and Scientific Reports, and top tier journals in control and automation with some of his papers receiving more than 300 citations. Notable contributions include studies on collective behaviors in complex systems, and the first dynamical model predicting the effect of sea level rise on migration dynamics.

Spin-orbit optical phenomena and their applications
24 November 2022 – 2:30 pm CET   |   Lorenzo Marrucci, Professor at Department of Physics, University of Naples Federico II – Italy

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.

Abstract: The angular momentum of a light beam in the paraxial limit can be split into spin and orbital components. Only recently, optical processes involving a conversion of angular momentum from one form to another and related phenomena were conceived and experimentally demonstrated. I will more specifically focus on the effects generated by optical devices named q-plates and their ensuing generalizations, which have proved to be extremely convenient tools for controlling the phase and polarization structure of light beams. Several applications of these devices have been demonstrated in classical photonics and in quantum optics during the last years. In this presentation, after introducing the main concepts of spin-orbit optical couplings and the underlying physics, I will review a selection of recent applications.

Short bio: Lorenzo Marrucci is currently full professor of Experimental Physics of Matter at the Federico II University of Naples. After completing a master’s and a PhD in physics at the University of Naples, he did his post-doctoral work at the University of California at Berkeley, in USA, and then returned to Naples as a researcher and then professor. His interests are mainly focused on optics and photonics, both classical and quantum, and on complex materials and light-matter interactions. Marrucci has been the author or coauthor of over 200 scientific articles in international journals and of five patents. In particular, he is internationally known for his invention of the q-plate, a liquid crystal device that can convert a variation of the spin angular momentum of light into orbital angular momentum. Marrucci has been principal investigator or coordinator of many national and international research projects, including a FET-Open and an ERC-Advanced Grant. He has also held various academic-management positions; currently he is Vice Rector for research at the University of Naples.

GINGER, Gyroscopes IN GEneral Relativity

01 December 2022 – 2:30 pm CET   |   Angela D. V. di Virgilio, Senior researcher at INFN Sez. Pisa – Italy

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Abstract: Measurements of the Earth’s rotation speed made with laser gyroscopes, otherwise known as ring lasers, certainly important for the Earth sciences, are also relevant for fundamental physics tests, as they contain terms of general relativity, such as de Sitter and Lense Thirring and provide unique data to investigate Lorentz’s violations. Ring lasers ensure long-term continuous operation with record sensitivity. The limit to be reached for studying the fundamental physics of 1 part in 109 of the Earth’s rotation speed has already been demonstrated by existing prototypes. The GINGER project is based on ring lasers, the apparatus will be described in detail with particular attention to its sensitivity limits.

Short bio: Angela D.V. Di Virgilio graduated in Physics in Pisa in 1982 and has been for 2 years post- doc at Purdue University for CDF, the experiment of the Top quark discovery. Since 1986 she is researcher at INFN-Pisa. In 1985 she entered the research for gravitational waves interferometer, for the development of the Virgo suspensions called SA, designed to extend the detection window up to 10Hz. She was responsible for Virgo’s Low Frequency Facility, R&D experiment, which measured the noise of the SA prototype around 10Hz. This experimental research has been instrumental for the discovery of gravitational waves, awarded with the 2016 Breakthrough and the 2017 Nobel Prize. Since 2007 she has been the promoter and manager of the research activity in Italy on ring lasers. She has proposed GINGER (Gyroscopes IN GEneral Relativity) for General Relativity tests with Earth experiments. Her activity is highly interdisciplinary; she is responsible for the GINGERINO prototype of the Gran Sasso underground laboratory, which is collecting data for seismology studies and has been an important test bed to define the GINGER apparatus and its data analysis. She has more than 300 published articles and h-index 66.

Entangled relativity
15 December 2022 – 2:30 pm CET   |   Olivier Minazzoli, Permanent researcher at Observatory of Côte d’Azur in Nice – France

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.

Abstract:

Entangled relativity is a new theory of relativity that does not allow gravity to be treated separately from matter fields. Unlike general relativity, the theory therefore satisfies the last of Einstein’s three original demands for an acceptable theory of relativity, which he named Mach’s Principle. Indeed, unlike in general relativity, inertia cannot be defined ex nihilo in entangled relativity, because the definition of the theory demands the existence of matter in the first place. Apart from that, the theory does not assume any new ingredient with respect to general relativity: for instance, spacetime is described by a four-dimensional manifold, the metric tensor encodes the mechanical properties of space as well as the inertia of bodies and gravitation, and its curvature is generated by matter fields. In fact, the theory even possesses one less free parameter w.r.t. general relativity, as Newton’s constant no longer is a fundamental constant in entangled relativity, but results from the primordial evolution of the universe. The theory also has the nice property to possess general relativity as one of its limits (for fairly generic situations). Finally, recent results also suggest a deep connection with the quantum world — in an eventually testable fashion.

Short bio:

Olivier Minazzoli received his PhD in relativistic astrophysics at the University Côte d’Azur (formally, University of Nice-Sophia Antipolis) in 2009. After two postdoctoral positions at the Observatory of Paris and at Caltech/JPL in Pasadena, he came back to Nice in 2014, where he has been doing research on the phenomenology of general relativity and its alternatives since then. He is also a former member of the LIGO-Virgo collaboration.

TBA
12 January 2022 – 2:30 pm CET   |   Valerio Cozzani, Professor at Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Chimica, Ambientale e dei Materiali, University of Bologna – Italy

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Abstract: TBA

Short bio: TBA

TBA
02 February 2023 – 2:30 pm CET   |   Felix Otto, Director at the Max Planck Institute for Mathematics in the Sciences, Leipzig – Germany

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Abstract: TBA

Short bio: TBA

TBA
16 February 2023 – 2.30 pm CET   |   Eduardo Montijano, Professor at Departamento de Informatica e Ingenieria de Sistemas, University of Zaragoza – Spain

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Abstract: TBA

Short bio: TBA

TBA
23 February 2023 – 2.30 pm CET   |   Endre Suli, Professor of Numerical Analysis, University of Oxford – UK

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Abstract: TBA

Short bio: TBA

TBA
09 March 2023 – 2.30 pm CET   |   Fabio Pasqualetti, Professor at Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California at Riverside – United States

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AbstractTBA

Short bio: TBA

TBA
16 March 2023 – 2:30 pm CET   | József Lőrinczi, Rényi Institute of Mathematics, Budapest – Hungary

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AbstractTBA

Short bio: TBA

TBA
04 May 2023 – 2:30 pm CEST   |   Manilo De Domenico, Associate Professor of Applied Physics at Department of Physics, University of Padua – Italy

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Abstract: TBA

Short bio: TBA

The program of the first series of Colloquia can be found here.

The program of the second series of Colloquia can be found here.

The organizers of this year’s series are Giacomo Ascione, Francesco Bajardi, and Simone Mancini. 
To be added to our weekly mailing list, or for any information, please contact any of them at the following emails: 
giacomo.ascione[at].unina.it  |  francesco.bajardi[at]unina.it  |  simone.mancini2[at]unina.it